Jimmy Page Fine Art Print
Jimmy Page Fine Art Print
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Jimmy Page Fine Art Print

  • 11x14 Matted, Numbered & Signed by Photographer $800 $800 $0
  • 16x20 Matted, Numbered & Signed by Photographer $1,000 $1,000 $0
  • 20x24 Matted, Numbered & Signed by Photographer $1,500 $1,500 $0
  • 11x14 Matted, Numbered & Signed by Photographer $800 $800 $0
  • 16x20 Matted, Numbered & Signed by Photographer $1,000 $1,000 $0
  • 20x24 Matted, Numbered & Signed by Photographer $1,500 $1,500 $0
Item Number:
  • OCS770723-01-FP
TOUR/SHOW:
  • Day on the Green #6 and #7
PHOTOGRAPHER:
DATE:
  • Jul 23, 1977

11x14 Matted, Signed & Numbered are from a limited edition of 150.

16x20 Matted, Signed & Numbered are from a limited edition of 150.

20x24 Matted, Signed & Numbered are from a limited edition of 75.

After the July 23rd Oakland "Day on the Green" show, a Bill Graham staffer was severely beaten for asking Peter Grant's [Zeppelin's manager] kid to return signage, torn down from dressing room doors. After an initial kick in the groin by Drummer, John Bonham, Zeppelin "security forces", including Grant, locked the BGP employee in a trailer and savagely beat him. Led Zeppelin's second Oakland show took place only after Bill Graham signed a letter of indemnification absolving Zeppelin from responsibility for the previous night's assault. The letter, signed by Graham under duress and with his left hand, was considered invalid, and Bonham, Grant and two security thugs were arrested.

About Baron Wolman

Settling in Haight-Ashbury in the 60's, Wolman was surrounded by Janis and the Grateful Dead in close-by digs. Wolman was soon accompanying journalist Jann Wenner to the now famous and genre-defining Mills College conference on rock music. Wenner happened to be the founder of Rolling Stone magazine. He liked Wolman's style, offered him a job and Wolman launched as the first official document-er of the new psychedelic age. Beginning with the magazine's opening issue, Wolman's photographs were windows on the parade of the different, the delightful and the doomed, and his pictures became the gold standard by which rock photography would be measured.